Patient-Reported Factors Associated with the Onset of Hyperf
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Prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of hyperfunctional voice disorders would be improved by better understanding their etiological contributing factors. Therefore, this study estimated the prevalence of etiological factors using self-reported data about disorder onset from a large cohort of patients with Phonotraumatic Vocal Hyperfunction (PVH) and Non-Phonotraumatic Vocal Hyperfunction (NPVH).

Retrospective chart review extracted the self-reported rate (gradual, sudden) and events associated (voice use, anxiety/stress, upper respiratory infection [URI]) with disorder onset from 1,577 patients with PVH and 979 patients with NPVH. Both patient groups reported a gradual onset more than a sudden onset. Voice use was the most frequently reported event for PVH and the NPVH group self-reported all three events at equal frequency. The largest PVH subgroups were associated with voice use while the NPVH subgroups were associated with only voice use, only URI, or only anxiety/stress.

The results support the general clinical view that PVH is most strongly related to the gradual accumulated effects of phonotrauma, while NPVH has a more heterogeneous etiology. The identified PVH and NPVH subgroups may have clinical relevance and future work could investigate differences in treatment and outcomes among these subgroups.

source: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0003489420956379
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