Primary Pulmonary Rhabdomyosarcoma in a Child - Current Issu
Introduction
Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the most common soft-tissue malignancy in childhood, occurs as primary tumors in head and neck, genitourinary tract, and extremities. Less commonly, it occurs in sites where striated muscle is not native – lung, bile ducts, eye, peripheral nerves, and cerebellum. Among pediatric intrathoracic neoplasms, primary pulmonary tumors are rare and RMS more so. Across the intergroup rhabdomyosarcoma study (IRS) Group I-III reports, barely six were of primary pulmonary origin. Overall, only about twenty cases were reported till 1996 and 31 till 2010, and a series of 3 has been added in 2013.

Case Report
A 9-year-old female presented with a week's history of fever, hemoptysis, and cough. There was no close tuberculous contact. The general examination was unremarkable. Systemic examination showed decreased air entry in the right infra-axillary area. Chest X-ray revealed a right mid zone, well-defined, homogeneous opacity. Contrast-enhanced computerized tomography (CECT) of the chest showed a 4 cm × 3 cm × 3 cm solid, noncalcified, and well-defined, iso- to hypo-dense, minimally enhancing lesion in the superior segment of the right lower lobe....

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5217146/
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