Primary Tumor Resection Prolongs Survival in Spinal Chondros
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To investigate (1) whether resection of primary tumor improves survival of metastatic spinal chondrosarcoma patients and (2) which subgroups of metastatic spinal chondrosarcoma patients benefit more from primary tumor resection, a study was conducted.

Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment for spinal chondrosarcoma, as chondrosarcoma is inherently resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, evidence which justifies resection of the primary tumor for patients with metastatic spinal chondrosarcoma is still lacking.

Researchers retrospectively included 110 patients with metastatic spinal chondrosarcoma in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 1983 to 2016. The association between primary tumor resection and survival was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analyses, log-rank tests, and multivariable Cox analyses. The effect of primary tumor resection on survival was further assessed in subgroups stratified by histologic subtype, tumor grade, and age.

Overall, 110 patients were divided into surgery group (n = 55, 50%) and nonsurgery group (n = 55, 50%). Primary tumor resection was associated with both prolonged overall survival (hazard ratio 0.262) and cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio 0.228). When reseachers focused on surgical effects in subgroups, primary tumor resection conferred survival advantage on patients with conventional subtype, grade I to III malignancy, and an age younger than 70 years old. However, primary tumor resection brought limited survival benefit for patients with dedifferentiated subtype and patients over 70 years old.

The present population-based study for the first time reports a clear association between primary tumor resection and prolonged survival in metastatic spinal chondrosarcoma patients. Specifically, primary tumor resection was associated with improved survival in patients with conventional subtype, grade I to III malignancy, and an age younger than 70 years old.

Source: https://journals.lww.com/spinejournal/Abstract/2020/12150/Primary_Tumor_Resection_Prolongs_Survival_in.8.aspx
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