Pseudoaneurysm after Transradial Coronary Angiography
Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...
Get authentic, real-time news that helps you fight COVID-19 better.
Install PlexusMD App for doctors. It's free.
An 81-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of a large, painless, and pulsatile swelling of the right wrist that had progressively increased in size (Panel A). She had a history of hypertension and mitral insufficiency and was taking aspirin, an antihypertensive medication, and a statin. The patient had undergone coronary angiography with a transradial approach 1 month earlier; a 4-French sheath was used, and sheath removal was followed by mechanical clamp compression. A clinical diagnosis of radial pseudoaneurysm was confirmed on ultrasonography. Pseudoaneurysms occur infrequently as a complication of transradial coronary angiography. Predisposing factors include the use of a large catheter sheath, multiple punctures at the site, the use of antiplatelet and antithrombotic agents, inadequate hemostasis or postprocedure compression, and vascular-site infection. The patient underwent surgical excision of the pseudoaneurysm and suture of the radial artery (Panels B and C)...

http://bit.ly/2s4fd8v
Dr. A●●●n S●●●●a and 16 others like this
Like
Comment
Share