Rapid 3D Printing Method Moves Toward 3D-printed Organs
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The hand, which would take six hours to create using conventional 3-D printing methods, demonstrates what engineers say is progress toward 3-D-printed human tissue and organs—biotechnology that could eventually save countless lives lost due to the shortage of donor organs.

"The technology we've developed is 10-50 times faster than the industry standard, and it works with large sample sizes that have been very difficult to achieve previously," says the study's co-lead author. The work is described in a study center on a 3-D printing method called stereolithography and jelly-like materials known as hydrogels, which are used to create, among things, diapers, contact lenses and scaffolds in tissue engineering.

The latter application is particularly useful in 3-D printing, and it's something the research team spent a major part of its effort optimizing to achieve its incredibly fast and accurate 3-D printing technique. "Our method allows for the rapid printing of centimeter-sized hydrogel models. It significantly reduces part deformation and cellular injuries caused by the prolonged exposure to the environmental stresses you commonly see in conventional 3-D printing methods," says the researcher.

Researchers say the method is particularly suitable for printing cells with embedded blood vessel networks, a nascent technology expected to be a central part of the production of 3-D-printed human tissue and organs.

Study:
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adhm.202002103
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