Reassuring Data on COVID-19 Vaccines In Pregnancy
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Pregnant women can safely get vaccinated with the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines for COVID-19, surveillance data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggest. More than 30,000 women who received these vaccines have reported pregnancies through the CDC's V-Safe voluntary reporting system.

The CDC has included pregnancy along with other underlying conditions that qualify people to be offered the vaccine. There is evidence that pregnant women who get COVID-19 are at increased risk of severe illness.

Analyzing Surveillance Data

To better assess whether the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines cause problems in pregnancy or childbirth, researchers analyzed data from V-Safe and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). At the time of the study, V-Safe recorded 55,220,364 reports from people who received at least one dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine through February 16.

These included 30,494 pregnancies, of which 16,039 were in women who received the Pfizer vaccine and 14,455 in women who received the Moderna vaccine. Most women reported pain, and some reported swelling, redness, and itching at the injection site. Of systemic reactions, fatigue was the most common, followed by headache, myalgia, chills, nausea, and fever.

Just 154 VAERS reports through February 16 concerned pregnant women. Of these, only 42 were for pregnancy-specific conditions. The other 73% were for adverse events reported for the general population of vaccinated people. There were 29 spontaneous abortions or miscarriages.


Vaccination Could Benefit Infants

In addition to the new safety data, experts continue to remind clinicians and the public that vaccination during pregnancy could benefit offspring. The unborn babies of pregnant women who receive the COVID-19 vaccine could be protected from the virus for the first several months of their lives.

Source:
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/acip/meetings/downloads/slides-2021-02/28-03-01/05-covid-Shimabukuro.pdf
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