Second Vaccine Dose Still Makes Organ Transplant Recipients
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A new study show that although two doses of a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 -; the virus that causes COVID 19 -; confers some protection for people who have received solid organ transplants, it's still not enough to enable them to dispense with masks, physical distancing and other safety measures.

The new study evaluated this immunogenic response following the second dose of either of the two messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines -; made by Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech -; for 658 transplant recipients, none of whom had a prior diagnosis of COVID-19. The participants completed their two-dose regimen between Dec. 16, 2020, and March 13, 2021.

In the most recent study, the researchers found that only 98 of the 658 study participants -; 15% -; had detectable antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 at 21 days after the first vaccine dose. This was comparable to the 17% reported in the March study looking at immune response after only one vaccine dose. At 29 days following the second dose, the number of participants with detectable antibodies rose to 357 out of 658 -; 54%.

After both vaccine doses were administered, 301 out of 658 participants -; 46% -; had no detectable antibody at all while 259 -; 39% -; only produced antibodies after the second shot. The researchers also found that among the participants, the most likely to develop an antibody response were younger, did not take immunosuppressive regimens including anti-metabolite drugs and received the Moderna vaccine.

"Given these observations, transplant recipients should not assume that two vaccine doses guarantee sufficient immunity against SARS-CoV-2 any more than it did after just one dose," says study co-author Dorry Segev, M.D., Ph.D., the Marjory K. and Thomas Pozefsky Professor of Surgery and Epidemiology and director of the Epidemiology Research Group in Organ Transplantation at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Source:
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2779852
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