Septic pulmonary embolism associated with periodontal diseas
Periodontal disease, including periodontitis, has been reported to be a rare cause of septic pulmonary embolism (SPE). It is however extremely difficult to isolate the causative pathogen of periodontal disease-associated SPE from blood cultures of these patients.

The present case has been published in BMC Infectious Diseases. an 85-year-old man was admitted with fever and worsening malaise. He was later noted to have multiple bilateral subpleural pulmonary nodules on chest computed tomography scan.

After admission, Parvimonas micra (P. micra) was isolated from his blood culture. This was followed by a meticulous search for the primary source of SPE, focusing on the head and neck areas. Consequently, apical periodontitis and infratemporal fossa abscess were identified as the primary sources of SPE.

Although P. micra is one of the most frequently detected bacteria in the infected root canals of teeth with chronic apical periodontitis, it has rarely been proven as a causative pathogen of periodontal disease-associated SPE.

Key takeaways:-
- It is likely that clinicians get confused when they encounter cases of SPE without major risk factors such as intravenous drug use, IE of the tricuspid valve, septic thrombophlebitis, and indwelling intravascular catheters.

- In such cases, periodontal disease could be an important source of SPE, and careful oral examination aimed at identifying the primary source of infection and causative pathogen, including anaerobes, may lead to appropriate and effective treatments for this condition.

Read in detail here: https://pxmd.co/jYdZQ
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