Steroid withdrawal after renal transplantation: a retrospect
Background
Immunosuppressive regimens in renal transplantation frequently contain corticosteroids, but many centers withdraw steroids as a consequence of unwanted side effects of steroids. The optimal timing to withdraw steroids after transplantation, however, remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine an optimal time point following kidney transplantation that is associated with reduced mortality without jeopardizing the allograft to allow safe discontinuation of steroids....


http://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-016-0772-6
Steroid withdrawal after renal transplantation: a retrospective cohort study
Immunosuppressive regimens in renal transplantation frequently contain corticosteroids, but many centers withdraw steroids as a consequence of unwanted side effects of steroids. The optimal timing to withdraw steroids after transplantation, however, remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine an optimal time point following kidney transplantation that is associated with reduced mortality without jeopardizing the allograft to allow safe discontinuation of steroids. We conducted a retrospective cohort study and computed a concatenated landmark-stratified Cox supermodel to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for mortality and graft loss using dynamic propensity score matching to adjust for confounding by indication. A total of 6070 first kidney transplant recipients in the Austrian Dialysis and Transplant Registry who were transplanted between 1990 and 2012 were evaluated and classified according to steroid treatment status throughout follow-up after kidney transplantation; 2142 patients were withdrawn from steroids during the study period. Overall, 1131 patients lost their graft and 821 patients in the study cohort died. Steroid withdrawal within 18 months after transplantation was associated with an increased rate of graft loss compared to steroid maintenance during that time (6 months after transplantation: HR?=?1.8; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.6; 18 months after transplantation: HR?=?1.3; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.6; 24 months after transplantation: HR?=?1.2; 95% CI, 0.9 to 1.5), while mortality was not different between groups. Our findings suggest that steroid withdrawal after anti-IL-2 induction in the first 18 months after transplantation is associated with an increased risk of allograft loss.
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