Study finds, Association between Renal function in short-sta
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Renal dysfunction is more likely in children born small for gestational age (SGA), particularly when combined with an extremely low birthweight (ELBW). Treatment with growth hormone (GH) is used to treat short-statured children born SGA; however, the effects of GH on renal function, especially in those born SGA with ELBW, are unknown.

Short-statured children born SGA (N = 42) were included. Subjects were subdivided into two groups based on their birthweight: the ELBW group (N = 15) with a birthweight of less than 1,000 g, and the non-ELBW group (N = 27) with birthweights ranging between 1,000 and 2,500 g. The creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) before (pre-eGFR) and 5 years after GH treatment (post-eGFR) were compared. Correlations between eGFR, anthropometric, or birth parameters, and cumulative GH dose were evaluated using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient.

Results:
--The ELBW group had a lower pre- and post-eGFR than the non-ELBW group.

--5 year GH treatment did not significantly reduce eGFR in either group.

--Post-eGFR was positively associated with gestational week and birthweight. However, the cumulative GH dose was not correlated with pre-eGFR, post-eGFR, or percentage change in eGFR.

--The change in bodyweight standard deviation score during GH treatment was positively correlated with delta-eGFR in the ELBW group.

In conclusion, the current findings showed that GH care was unlikely to be a cause of eGFR reduction in short-statured children born SGA. However, eGFR should be closely monitored, especially in those born SGA with ELBW, since their eGFR was lower than that of non-ELBW subjects.

Source: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ped.14514?af=R
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