Study finds, factors associated with Changes in volumetric b
Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have impaired volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) assessed with high-resolution peripheral computed tomography (HRpQCT). This first longitudinal HRpQCT study in AS shows that cortical and trabecular vBMD decreased at tibia and that signs of inflammation were associated with cortical bone loss at tibia and radius.

Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have reduced volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) in the peripheral skeleton assessed with high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT). The aims were to investigate longitudinal changes in vBMD, cortical area, and microarchitecture and to assess factors associated with changes in vBMD and cortical area in men with AS.

HRpQCT of radius and tibia was performed in 54 men with AS at baseline and after 5 years. Univariate and multivariable linear regression analysis were used.

Results:
--At tibia, there were significant decreases exceeding least significant changes (LSC) in cortical and trabecular vBMD, mean (SD) percent change ?1.0 and ?2.7 respectively.

--In multivariable regression analyses, increase in disease activity measured by ASDAS_CRP from baseline to follow-up was associated with decreases in cortical vBMD (beta -0.86) and cortical area (beta ?1.66) at tibia.

--At radius, no changes exceeded LSC. Nonetheless, increase in ASDAS_CRP was associated with decreases in cortical vBMD, and high time-averaged ESR was associated with decreases in cortical area.

--Treatment with TNF inhibitor more than 4 years during follow-up was associated with increases in cortical vBMD and cortical area at tibia, whereas exposure to bisphosphonates was associated with increases in cortical measurements at radius.

--No disease-related variables or treatments were associated with changes in trabecular vBMD.

The findings of this first investigation of longitudinal HRpQCT in individuals with AS reinforce the need of reducing disease activity to preserve peripheral skeleton bone density.

Source: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00198-021-06049-4
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