Study finds, the interactions between MRI-detected osteophyt
A Study was conducted to investigate the longitudinal association between MRI-detected osteophyte scores and progression of knee symptoms, and whether the association was modified in the presence of bone marrow lesions (BMLs) or effusion-synovitis.

Data from Vitamin D Effects on Osteoarthritis (VIDEO) study, a randomized, double-blinded and placebo-controlled clinical trial in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients, were analyzed as an exploratory study. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) was used to assess knee symptoms. Osteophytes, BMLs and effusion-synovitis were measured using MRI.

Results:
--334 participants with MRI information and WOMAC score (baseline and follow-up) were included in the analyses, with

--24.3% of them having knee pain increased 2 years later. Statistically significant interactions were found between MRI-detected osteophytes and BMLs or effusion-synovitis on increased knee symptoms.

--In participants with BMLs, higher baseline scores of MRI-detected osteophytes in most compartments were significantly associated with increased total knee pain, weight-bearing pain, stiffness, and physical dysfunction, after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, intervention and effusion-synovitis.

--In participants with effusion-synovitis, higher baseline scores of MRI-detected osteophytes in almost all the compartments were significantly associated with increased total knee pain, weight-bearing pain, stiffness, and physical dysfunction, after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, intervention and BMLs.

--In contrast, MRI-detected osteophyte scores were generally not associated with knee symptom progression in participants without baseline BMLs or effusion-synovitis.

MRI-detected surgery in the people with BML or effusion outbreak-synovitis, but not in persons lacking BMLs or outbreak-synovitis, is closely linked to greater overall knee discomfort, weights-bearing knee pain, rigidity and physical dysfunction. This implies that they may interact with bone or synovial abnormalities in order to generate knee OA symptoms.

Source: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1063458421008141?dgcid=rss_sd_all
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