Study shows inhaled toxic particles take direct route from l
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The scientists revealed they had found various fine particles in human cerebrospinal fluids taken from patients who had experienced brain disorders—uncovering a process which may result in toxic particulate substances ending up in the brain. The data suggests that up to eight times the number of fine particles may reach the brain by traveling, via the bloodstream, from the lungs than pass directly via the nose—adding new evidence on the relationship between air pollution and detrimental effects of such particles on the brain. Air pollution is a cocktail of many toxic components, but particulate matter (PM, especially ambient fine particles such as PM2.5 and PM0.1), are the most concerning in terms of causing detrimental health effects. Ultrafine particles, in particular, are able to escape the body's protective systems, including sentinel immune cells and biological barriers.

The team of scientists discovered that inhaled particles can enter the bloodstream after crossing the air-blood barrier—eventually reaching the brain, and leading to damage of the brain-blood barrier and surrounding tissues as they do so. Once in the brain, the particles were hard to clear and were retained for longer than in other organs.

Source: https://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2117083119
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