Study shows older age and smoking most important risk factor
A new large study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society (ACS) shows older age and smoking are the two most important risk factors associated with a relative and absolute five-year risk of developing any cancer. The results showed 15,226 invasive cancers were diagnosed among 429,991 participants within five-years of enrollment. The multivariable-adjusted relative risk of any cancer was strongest for current smokers compared with never smokers. In men, alcohol intake, family history of cancer, red meat consumption, and physical inactivity were also associated with risk. In women, body mass index (BMI), type 2 diabetes, hysterectomy, parity, family history of cancer, hypertension, tubal ligation, and physical inactivity were associated with cancer risk. Absolute five-year risk exceeded two-percent among nearly all persons greater than 50 years old and among some persons less than 50 years old including current or former smokers (less than 30 years since quitting) and long-term nonsmokers with a BMI greater than 25 or a first-degree family history of cancer. The absolute five-year risk was as high as 29% in men and 25% in women.

Source: https://acsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cncr.34396
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