The impact of occluding pairs on the chewing patterns among
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Highlights
• occluding pairs significantly impacted on many chewing patterns among the aging population.

• To maintain as many occluding pairs as possible provided better chewing function in the elderly.

• The increasing occluding pairs effectively elevated the bite force in the aging population.

•The increasing occluding pairs significantly shortened chewing time and mealtime duration.

This study aims to investigate the impact of occluding pairs (OPs) on chewing strokes, chewing time, mealtime duration, and bite force in an aging population.

The 100 participants included 52 women and 48 men with average age of 71.2 years. The subjects were restricted to those who can eat what they wanted and had no temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and dysphagia history; their OPs were counted in the posterior occlusal support zone in accordance with the Eichner classification. Free habitual mastication of a cornstarch cookie was analyzed by recording the number of chewing strokes and the amount of time needed for complete mastication. Strokes were counted by considering the opening and closing mandibular movements. Mealtime was defined as the time spent to finish a lunchbox and accomplish swallowing. Bite force was estimated with a T-Scan III®. A linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the impact of the OPs on the chewing strokes, chewing time, mealtime duration, and bite force.

In this study, 76% of the participants had 4 OPs and 12% of participants had 3 OPs. Increasing the OPs significantly shortened the chewing time and mealtime duration. The mealtime duration did not notably affect the chewing time. There was a significant association between OPs and bite force.

In elderly, increasing OPs significantly raised the bite force and shortened the chewing time and strokes. More OPs might be the key to maintain good chewing function. Among the elderly, increasing OPs significantly raised the bite force and shortened the chewing time and mealtime duration. To provide better chewing function, good oral hygiene is important to maintain as many OPs as possible; how to gain more OPs is an essential concern in prosthodontic treatment plan making.

Source:https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030057122030258X
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