The radiographic tibial spine area is correlated with the oc
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The purpose of this study was to reveal the possible influence of the tibial spine area on the occurrence of ACL injury.

39 subjects undergoing anatomical ACL reconstruction (30 female, 9 male: average age 29±15.2) and 37 subjects with intact ACL (21 female, 16 male: average age 29±12.5) were included in this study. In the anterior–posterior (A–P) and lateral knee radiograph, the tibial spine area was measured using a PACS system. In axial knee MRI exhibiting the longest femoral epicondylar length, the intercondylar notch area was measured. Tibial spine area, tibial spine area/body height, and tibial spine area/notch area were compared between the ACL tear and intact groups.

Results:
--The A–P tibial spine area of the ACL tear and intact groups was 178±34 and 220.7±58mm2, respectively.

--The lateral tibial spine area of the ACL tear and intact groups was 145.7±36.9 and 178.9±41.7mm2, respectively.

--The tibial spine area was significantly larger in the ACL intact group when compared with the ACL tear group (A–P: p=0.02, lateral: p=0.03).

--This trend was unchanged even when the tibial spine area was normalized by body height (A–P: p=0.01, lateral: p=0.02). The tibial spine area/notch area of the ACL tear and intact groups showed no significant difference.

Finally, when comparing the ACL tear group to the ACL intact group, the A–P and lateral tibial spine region was substantially smaller in the ACL tear group. Despite the small sample size, a small tibial spine may be a source of knee instability, which could lead to ACL injury.

Source: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00167-021-06523-w
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