These 9 Antihypertensives might protect against depression:
Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...
None of the 41 most common high blood pressure medications increased the risk of depression, while nine medications appeared to lower it, according to a study from Denmark, published today in Hypertension, an AHA journal.

The four main categories of blood pressure-lowering medications were reviewed: angiotensin agents (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers, or ARBs); calcium antagonists; beta-blockers; and diuretics.

The analysis found:

-- None of the 41 most common high blood pressure medications increased the risk of depression.

-- Nine medications significantly lowered depression risk:
The ACE inhibitors enalapril and ramipril, Calcium channel blockers amlodipine, verapamil, and verapamil combinations, The beta-blockers propranolol, atenolol, bisoprolol, and carvedilol

-- Diuretic medications showed no impact on depression risk.

Researchers recommended clinicians "use one of the identified individual nine drugs depending on the somatic indication, especially in patients at increased risk of developing depression, including patients with prior depression or anxiety and patients with a family history of depression."

Study results confirmed the hypothesis that angiotensin agents and calcium antagonists were associated with less depression. It was a surprise that this applied to beta-blockers as well, the group noted.

"It is possible that these nine drugs possess other off-target receptor or anti-inflammatory properties that they do not share with the remaining 32 antihypertensives, but we are not aware of studies specifically investigating potential anti-inflammatory effects of these nine drugs," according to the authors.

Their study sought out cases of incident depression from 2005 to 2015 among 5.4 million individuals in Denmark, nearly 3.75 million of whom were exposed to antihypertensives during that period.

Source: https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.120.15605
Dr. T●●●●z H●●●●●●i and 5 others like this1 share
Like
Comment
Share
Dr. R●●●●h  b●●u
Dr. R●●●●h b●●u General Medicine
Nice information.
Aug 24, 2020Like