Transient cortical blindness after intradiscal oxygen–ozone
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Cortical blindness (CB)–a subset of cerebral blindness–is a neurological syndrome characterized by bilateral visual loss (VL) in the context of normal pupillary function, extraocular eye movements, and fundoscopy results. This syndrome is often associated with ischemia of the visual cortex, head trauma, migraines, hypertensive encephalopathy and many other lesions of the visual cortex. It is often caused by dysfunction or destruction of both occipital lobes. If no structural abnormality is identified, the prognosis is usually favorable. If the lesion extends beyond the striate cortex into the visual association area, patients with CB may exhibit anosognosia (also known as Anton's syndrome, in which the patient may deny blindness). Anosognosia is often associated with concomitant dysfunction of the parietal lobe, more often on the right side than on the left. A 54-year-old Caucasian male developed bilateral blindness during an oxygen–ozone injection for disc herniation. The visual loss (VL) was immediately followed by severe frontal headache, vomiting, and nausea. The patient underestimated the VL showing Anton's syndrome, with a complete visual recovery after 2-month follow-up. Magnetic resonance data were consistent with recent ischemic lesions in bilateral vascular territories of posterior cerebral arteries.

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