Transparent dentin region in the tooth root
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A 60‐year‐old patient underwent extraction of the mandibular second premolar because of tooth mobility and severe attachment loss due to periodontal disease. The tooth tissue, particularly the optical properties of root dentin, changes as aging progresses. Dentin transparency is a commonly observed physiological process in aged teeth that starts at the apical end of the root and often extends into the coronal dentin (Figure 1A). However, it is difficult for practitioners to determine the presence of this anomaly without extracting the tooth. In this case, the transparent dentin was observed using a scanning electron microscope. The dentin tubule lumens had become filled with mineral (yellow arrows), decreasing the amount of light that scattered off the lumens (Figure 1B).

Transparent dentin is brittle in comparison with healthy dentin; it is also weaker.1 Thus, transparent dentin is more fragile and susceptible to cracks, which cause root fractures. Symptoms of root fractures are dull pain, gingival swelling, and sinus tracts that lead to deep localized periodontal pockets and vertical bone defects. Tooth fracture is a major problem in dentistry and a common cause of tooth loss. The morphological variations of dentin make it a difficult substrate to manage in clinical dentistry.

Source: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ccr3.2937?af=R
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