Traumatic skin wounds may be risk factor for infective endoc
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Traumatic skin wounds may be a risk factor for infective endocarditis in the weeks after wound development, according to findings published in Heart.

Current data suggest that a history of traumatic open skin wounds may be a risk factor for infectious endocarditis, with limited evidence. Researchers tested the hypothesis that traumatic skin wound is a risk factor for infectious endocarditis.

Using the Japan Medical Data Center (JMDC) database (4 650 927 people aged 20-64 years, 2012-2018) and the Kumamoto database (493 414 people aged more than 65 years, 2012-2017), researchers conducted nested case-control and self-controlled case series (SCCS) analyses.

Results:
-- In the JMDC database, 544 cases hospitalized for infective endocarditis (IE) were matched with 2091 controls; 2.8% of cases and 0.5% of controls were exposed to traumatic skin wounds in the previous 1-4 weeks, with an adjusted OR of 4.31.

-- In the Kumamoto database, 4.0% (27/670) of cases and 1.1% (29/2581) of controls were exposed to traumatic skin wounds in the previous 1-4 weeks, with an adjusted OR of 4.15.

-- In the SCCS, the incidence rate ratios for IE were 2.61, 1.73, 1.19 and 1.52 for the Kumamoto database and 3.78, 1.58, 1.60 and 1.29 for the JMDC database at 1-4, 5-8, 9-12 and 13-16 weeks after traumatic skin wound, respectively, compared with the baseline period.

Conclusively, this study suggests that traumatic skin wound is a risk factor for IE 1-4 weeks after the wound.

Source: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33632746/
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