Type 1 Diabetes Reduces Lifespan By 8 Years, Finds Study
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The average British adult with type 1 diabetes loses about eight life-years compared with nondiabetic age peers, according to a modeling study.

Drawing upon national data from the U.K., the "average" person with type 1 diabetes -- age about 43 -- could expect to live 32.6 more years, reported researchers.

That's against an expectancy of 40.2 additional life years for an average 43-year-old without diabetes, the group reported in Cardiovascular Endocrinology & Metabolism and simultaneously at the virtual European Association for the Study of Diabetes 2020 meeting.

With sustained growth of diabetes numbers, sustained patient engagement is essential. Using nationally available data, researchers have shown that the higher mortality associated with a diagnosis of T1DM/T2DM could produces loss of 6.4 million future life years in the current UK population.

In the model, the ‘average’ person with T1DM (age 42.8 years) has a life expectancy from now of 32.6 years, compared to 40.2 years in the equivalent age non diabetes mellitus population, corresponding to lost life years (LLYs) of 7.6 years/average person.

The ‘average’ person with T2DM (age 65.4 years) has a life expectancy from now of 18.6 years compared to the 20.3 years for the equivalent non diabetes mellitus population, corresponding to LLY of 1.7 years/average person.

Researchers estimate that for both T1DM and T2DM, one year with HbA1c greater than 58 mmol/mol loses around 100 life days. Linking glycaemic control to mortality has the potential to focus minds on effective engagement with therapy and lifestyle recommendation adherence.

Source: https://journals.lww.com/cardiovascularendocrinology/Abstract/9000/Estimating_life_years_lost_to_diabetes__outcomes.99935.aspx
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