Ultrasound Has Potential To Damage Novel Coronaviruses: Stud
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Coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2, may be vulnerable to ultrasound vibrations, within the frequencies used in medical diagnostic imaging, according to a study that used computer simulations. The researchers modelled the mechanical response of the coronaviruses to vibrations across a range of ultrasound frequencies.

They found that vibrations between 25 and 100 megahertz triggered the virus' shell and spikes to collapse and start to rupture within a fraction of a millisecond. The finding, shows this effect in simulations of the virus in both air and in water. The team said that its findings are a first hint at a possible ultrasound-based treatment for coronaviruses, including the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19.

In their study, the researchers introduced acoustic vibrations into the simulations and observed how the vibrations rippled through the coronavirus' structure across a range of ultrasound frequencies. They started with vibrations of 100 megahertz, or 100 million cycles per second, which they estimated would be the shell's natural vibrating frequency, based on what's known of the virus' physical properties.

When the researchers exposed the virus to 100 MHz ultrasound excitations, the virus' natural vibrations were initially undetectable. However, within a fraction of a millisecond the external vibrations, resonating with the frequency of the virus' natural oscillations, caused the shell and spikes to buckle inward, similar to a ball that dimples as it bounces off the ground.

As the researchers increased the amplitude, or intensity, of the vibrations, the shell could fracture an acoustic phenomenon known as resonance that also explains how opera singers can crack a wineglass if they sing at just the right pitch and volume. At lower frequencies of 25 MHz and 50 MHz, the virus buckled and fractured even faster, both in simulated environments of air, and of water that is similar in density to fluids in the body, they said.

Source:
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022509621000600
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