Unusual Spinal Dysraphic Lesions in a 8 month old Child
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Introduction
The neural tube closure occurs through intersection of waves which comes from different spots of the craniospinal axis. The human tail is a rare congenital dysraphic anomaly, with prominent lesion from the lumbosacrococcygeal region and, sometimes, with intradural components, that is why the magnetic resonance image (MRI) is mandatory during diagnosis investigation. Regarding myelomeningocele (MM), the literature about the subject assumes that it is formed by a compromising of the union between the fourth and fifth wave, usually isolated, being of 0.038% the incidence of multiples spinal dysraphism. Three unusual cases of spinal dysraphism are described here: two infantile cases of human tail and a newborn with a multiple thoracic MM. The families and caregivers have agreed and authorized the publishing of all cases.

Case
A female child was born with a prominent lesion from the lumbar region, without any kind of neurological disabilities related from parents. With six months of age, she was submitted to a medical evaluation which showed a normal neurological result. MRI of the lumbosacral region was requested and identified an appendage lesion with approximately 2?cm, with no communication with the spinal cord, which developed a false human tail. The surgical resection began with a half-moon incision, made in the lumbosacral region, 0.5?cm above the lesion. Opening plans following the fibroelastic tissue found, until its communications with the dura. Opening the dura for investigation of possible intradural component and surgical revision with microscopy (using microsurgical technique). Fibroelastic tissue was identified and no structure suggestive of nerve tissue within the lesion was found, confirmed by the histopathological study. A complete resection of the lesion was made....

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3806233/
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