Visionary bone damage study
Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...Now open: Certificate Course in Management of Covid-19 by Govt. Of Gujarat and PlexusMDKnow more...
A novel way to pinpoint and illuminate bone damage promises to make X-rays more efficient at diagnosing bone and other injuries, researchers say.

The new technique, looking at potential biomedical applications of an ancient inorganic salt-based aggregation-induced emission (AIE) radio-luminescence material, could open new frontiers in medicine including X-ray dosimetry, bioimaging, and advanced applications such as optogenetics, says the scientist.

The review article examined the potential of the AIEgen luminogens (AIEgens) in deep tissue imaging. The study used X-ray testing provided by Adelaide-based Micro-X.

"We were able to use Micro-X advanced X-ray machines at the Tonsley Innovation District to show the benefits of this AIEgen system which can be excited by X-ray (as the radioluminescence emitter) and UV light (as the photoluminescence emitter) compared to current AIEgens which mostly only act as the photoluminescence emitter," the author says.

"The study highlighted the disadvantages of autofluorescence, poor signal-to-noise radio, and poor tissue penetration depth of traditional photoluminescence emitters which could be elegantly solved by these radioluminescence luminogens."

Lead author says the next generation of fluorescent gels could also capitalize on additional light-emitting properties making them attractive for different applications. The latest work not only explores a series of inorganic AIE systems but also "fundamentally helps to understand both the unconventional organic and inorganic clusteroluminescence phenomena, the author concludes.

Aggregate
Source: https://doi.org/10.1002/agt2.36
Like
Comment
Share