Visual Function in Eyes with Intermediate AMD with and witho
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In intermediate Age-related macular degeneration, a simple, clinically feasible vision test of sensitivity to radial deformation is significantly more impaired in eyes with hyperpigmentation than in eyes with large drusen but normal retinal pigmentation, consistent with the former's increased risk of progression to advanced Age-related macular degeneration. This ongoing longitudinal study will determine whether this vision measure is predictive of progression to advanced Age-related macular degeneration. This study aimed to determine whether simple, clinically feasible psychophysical measures distinguish between two levels of intermediate Age-related macular degeneration that differ in their risk of progression to advanced Age-related macular degeneration: eyes with large macular drusen and retinal pigment abnormalities versus eyes with large macular drusen without pigment abnormalities. Abnormal pigmentation in the presence of large drusen is associated with a higher risk of development of advanced Age-related macular degeneration.

Each eye of 39 individuals with the same form of intermediate Age-related macular degeneration in both eyes was tested monocularly on a battery of vision tests. The measures (photopic optotype contrast sensitivity, discrimination of desaturated colors, and sensitivity to radial deformation [shape discrimination hyperacuity]) were compared for both dominant and nondominant eyes. ANOVA with an eye (dominant or non-dominant) as a within-subject factor and retinal status (pigmentary abnormalities present or absent from the macula) as a between-subject factor was used to determine statistical significance. Sensitivity to radial deformation was significantly reduced in eyes with large drusen and pigment changes compared with eyes with large drusen and normal retinal pigmentation.

In the presence of large macular drusen, performance on a shape discrimination task is related to the presence versus absence of abnormal retinal pigmentation, being poorer in the higher-risk group, supportive of the measure's potential to predict progression to advanced Age-related macular degeneration.

Source: https://journals.lww.com/optvissci/Fulltext/2021/01000/Visual_Function_in_Eyes_with_Intermediate_AMD_with.10.aspx
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