Vitamins C and E Linked to Reduced Risk for Parkinson's Dise
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Higher intake of vitamins C and E was associated with a reduced risk for Parkinson's disease (PD) in an analysis of a national cohort study. Higher intake of both vitamins, as opposed to one, strengthened the association with lower PD risk.

This study aimed to determine whether high baseline dietary antioxidants and total non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity (NEAC) is associated with a lower risk of Parkinson disease in men and women, researchers prospectively studied 43,865 men and women from a large Swedish cohort.

In the Swedish National March Cohort 43,865 men and women aged 18–94 years were followed through record linkages to National Health Registries from 1997 until 2016. Baseline dietary vitamin E, C and beta-carotene intake, as well as NEAC, were assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire collected at baseline. All exposure variables were adjusted for energy intake and categorized into tertiles.

Results:
-- After a mean follow-up time of 17.6 years researchers detected 465 incidence cases of Parkinson disease. In the multivariable adjusted model, dietary vitamin E and C were inversely associated with the risk of Parkinson disease, when comparing subjects in the highest to the lowest tertiles of the exposure.

-- No association was found with estimated intake of dietary beta-carotene or NEAC.

Conclusively, the findings suggest that dietary vitamin E and C intake might be inversely associated with the risk of Parkinson disease. No association was found with dietary beta-carotene or NEAC. This study provides Class III evidence that dietary vitamin E and C intake are inversely associated with the risk of Parkinson disease.

Source: https://n.neurology.org/content/early/2021/01/06/WNL.0000000000011373
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