World's smallest surviving baby boy discharged from hospital
In August 2018, a baby boy was born in Tokyo weighing only 9.45 ounces (268 grams) — about the weight of a bag of potato chips.

The boy had stopped growing in his mother's womb, doctors at Keio University Hospital told Reuters, and had to be delivered by an emergency Caesarean section 24 weeks into the mother's pregnancy to avoid a stillbirth. But the baby was smaller and less developed than he should have been at 24 weeks, which is the youngest age most doctors consider "viable," meaning the child can survive outside the womb. He could not breath or eat on his own, and his entire body fit inside his parents' cupped hands.

But last week, on Feb. 20, after five months of treatment, that baby boy was finally discharged from Keio University Hospital and allowed to go home with his family. Though he now weighs a healthy 7 pounds (3.2 kilograms), he leaves the hospital with the distinction of being the world's smallest surviving male baby born in recorded history.

"There are only four babies this small [that survived] that we know of in the history of mankind," said Dr. Edward Bell, a professor of neonatal pediatrics at the University of Iowa's Carver College of Medicine. "It's exceedingly rare. And for boys, as far as I can tell, it's unique."

Bell is the founder and webmaster of the Tiniest Babies Registry, the University of Iowa's database of the world's smallest surviving babies born since 1936. The baby boy born in Tokyo last August ranks as the fourth-smallest child on Bell's registry, and is surpassed by three baby girls from Tokyo, Illinois and Germany, all born at 25 weeks and weighing 9.34, 9.17 and 8.88 ounces (265, 260 and 252 g), respectively.

Read more: https://www.livescience.com/64887-tiniest-baby-boy.html
A●- Z●●●●n and 60 others like this33 shares
Like
Comment
Share
Dr. H●●●●h D●●●i
Dr. H●●●●h D●●●i Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Remarkable but we should watch his childhood milestones.
Mar 6, 2019Like
Dr. M G K●●●●●●●A
Dr. M G K●●●●●●●A Paediatrics
Leaps in perinatal care.... Shud watch for neurodevelopment.
Mar 7, 2019Like