Musculoskeletal ultrasound assessment in Pediatric Knee Hype
Chronic joint pain related to hypermobility is a common referral to pediatric rheumatology clinics. The aim of the Study is to describe the musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) characteristics of the knee in a population with joint hypermobility and pain in comparison to control participants.

For a case-control analysis, participants were divided into three classes.
1)Participants in the case community had hypermobility and pain signs in their knees (H + P).
2) One control group had knee hypermobility but no pain symptoms (H-P), while
3)The other control group had neither knee hypermobility nor pain symptoms (NP).
For each knee, B-mode and Doppler MSUS images were collected and graded. For demographic variables and MSUS findings, descriptive statistics are used. To assess the likelihood of synovial effusion and a higher synovial effusion/hypertrophy quantitative score, regression analysis is used.

Results:
--MSUS assessment was performed on 91 knees of 50 participants. H?+?P knees were more likely to have positive findings noted on MSUS (94% vs. 70% of H-P and 74% of NP knees).

--Patellar tendon hyperemia was more common in H?+?P knees (52%, vs. 19% among H-P and 23% among NP).

--Participants who reported taking scheduled non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) had an increased risk of synovial effusion (RR?=?1.83) and a trend towards increased risk of a higher synovial effusion/hypertrophy quantitative score (RR?=?1.77).

In conclusion, although all participants had positive MSUS results, patellar tendon hyperemia was more common in those with knee hypermobility and pain symptoms. Furthermore, NSAID use was linked to a higher risk of synovial effusion and a higher synovial effusion/hypertrophy quantitative score.

Source: https://ped-rheum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12969-021-00546-w
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